Loading…
This event has ended. Visit the official site or create your own event on Sched.
Registration is open to all ticketholders. If you are having issues signing up, please email tickets@moogfest.com
View analytic
Sunday, May 22 • 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Google Brain: Magenta

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

Join the Google Brain team for an overview of their vision and a discussion of the role that artificial intelligence will play in the future of music and art.

As deep learning has brought the dream of intelligent machines ever closer, the Google Brain has launched Magenta, a project to explore how we might also imbue machines with creativity. Drawing inspiration from recent applications of computer vision models to the creation of compelling, “artistic” images (e.g. Deep Dream), they are developing techniques for training neural networks to generate music and sound as well. They hope to engage artists, software developers, and machine learning researchers in using and growing their shared, open-source codebase built on TensorFlow (www.tensorflow.org). More generally, they hope Magenta gives rise to a larger community of researchers and creators working on new ways to merge computation with art and music generation, continuing their tradition as a communal endeavor.

Moderators
avatar for Douglas Eck

Douglas Eck

Douglas is a a research scientist working at the intersection of music and machine learning. Before coming to Google in 2010 he was an associate professor of computer science at Université de Montréal where he worked closely with the LISA machine learning lab, the BRAMS center for Brain Music and Sound and the CIRMMT group at McGill. He also worked with Ubisoft on video game player modeling.
avatar for Adam Florin

Adam Florin

Adam Florin is a creative technologist exploring languages and computer systems for storytelling and expression. He is the creator of Patter, a real-time/freeform generative music system for Ableton Live. By day he produces data visualizations for Scientific American, Facebook, and many others at Pitch Interactive. He also advises the online magazine Triple Canopy, and has built creative software tools for e-flux, MoMA, Cycling '74, and two... Read More →
avatar for Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts earned his PhD in Computer Science from UC Berkeley with a designated emphasis in Computational and Genomic Biology. He has since focused on combining music and technology as a software engineer at Google, where he helped to organize the world's music knowledge for Google Play and is now applying deep learning to the generation of music and art for Google Brain.
avatar for Gil Weinberg & Shimon

Gil Weinberg & Shimon

Shimon, the robotic marimba player, can listen to, understand, collaborate with, and surprise his human counterparts. Along with a few other robotic musicians and musical cyborgs developed by Georgia Tech’s Robotic Musicianship group, Shimon uses artificial intelligence and creativity algorithms to push musical experiences and outcomes to uncharted domains. The Robotic Musicianship Group at Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology aims to... Read More →
avatar for Tobias Overath, Phd (Duke University)

Tobias Overath, Phd (Duke University)

Tobias Overath investigates how the brain processes sound—from very basic sound attributes such as pitch or timbre, to more complex signals such as speech—using a combination of behavioral, electrophysiological (M/EEG) and hemodynamic (fMRI) methods. He studied musicology and psychology at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany before moving across the Channel to earn an MSc in neuroscience at the University of Oxford, England. He... Read More →

Program Themes
avatar for Art & Artificial Intelligence

Art & Artificial Intelligence

We are entering into a new age of computer science research: an age where machine learning algorithms use neural networks or probabilistic Markov models to emulate thinking, and consequently, conscious creativity. It is not merely encyclopedic knowledge, but creative problem solving that will define the future of artificial intelligence. What does it mean if computers be taught to hear, write, improvise, and play music? And can they do it in a... Read More →



Twitter Feed